induce


induce
induce, persuade, prevail, get are comparable when meaning to move another by arguments, entreaties, or promises to do or agree to something or to follow a recommended course.
Induce usually implies overcoming indifference, hesitation, or opposition especially by offering for consideration persuasive advantages or gains that depend upon the desired decision being made; the term usually suggests that the decision is outwardly at least made by the one induced rather than forced upon him by the one that induces
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only those . . . doctors who were possessed of superior courage and capable of supreme self-sacrifice could be induced to continue at the work— Heiser

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the object is to induce the child to lend of his own free will; so long as authority is required, the end aimed at has not been achieved— Russell

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conditions which had induced many persons to emigrate from the old country— Dewey

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Persuade implies a winning over by an appeal, entreaty, or expostulation addressed as much to feelings as to reason; it usually implies that the one persuaded is more or less won over by the one that persuades
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it is not very difficult to persuade people to do what they are all longing to do— Huxley

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deputed by the firm of lawyers ... to persuade her to resume her married life— Powell

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Prevail, usually with on or upon, may be employed in place of either induce or persuade, but it usually carries a stronger implication of opposition to be faced or of good arguments to be overcome
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he had never before supposed that, could Wickham be prevailed on to marry his daughter, it would be done with so little inconvenience to himself as by the present arrangement— Austen

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I will go now and try to prevail on my mother to let me stay with you— Shaw

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prevailed upon the men in the sloop to sail up the river again, to rescue any survivors— M. S. Douglas

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Get in this relation (see also GET 1) is a much more neutral term than the others discriminated and it may replace any of them when the method by which a favorable decision is brought about is irrelevant or, sometimes, is deliberately not stressed
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finally got the boy to do his homework

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tried to get the union to accept arbitration

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succeeded in getting the Russians to relinquish certain claims for war damages— Americana Annual

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Analogous words: incite, instigate, abet: *move, actuate, drive, impel: motivate, *activate, actuate
Contrasted words: *command, order, enjoin, direct, bid, charge: *prescribe, assign, define

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • induce — INDÚCE, indúc, vb. III. tranz. 1. A împinge, a îndemna pe cineva să facă un lucru. ♢ expr. A induce în eroare = a înşela, a amăgi. ♦ (log.) A face un raţionament inductiv. 2. A produce un câmp electric prin inducţie electromagnetică. [part.… …   Dicționar Român

  • induce — in‧duce [ɪnˈdjuːs ǁ ɪnˈduːs] verb [transitive] to make someone decide to do something, perhaps something that seems unwise: induce somebody to do something • Lower interest rates would induce customers to borrow more. * * * induce UK US… …   Financial and business terms

  • Induce — In*duce , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Induced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Inducing}.] [L. inducere, inductum; pref. in in + ducere to lead. See {Duke}, and cf. {Induct}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To lead in; to introduce. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] The poet may be seen… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • induce — I verb actuate, adducere, be responsible, bring about, bring on, bring to pass, call forth, cause, conduce, convince, create, effect, effectuate, exercise influence over, generate, hasten, impellere, incite, inducere, influence, instigate, kindle …   Law dictionary

  • induce — [in do͞os′, indyo͞os′] vt. induced, inducing [ME enducen < L inducere < in , in + ducere, to lead: see DUCT] 1. to lead on to some action, condition, belief, etc.; prevail on; persuade 2. to bring on; bring about; cause; effect [to induce… …   English World dictionary

  • induce — (v.) late 14c., to lead by persuasions or other influences, from L. inducere lead into, bring in, introduce, conduct, persuade, from in into, in, on, upon (see IN (Cf. in ) (2)) + ducere to lead (see DUKE (Cf. duke) (n.)). Meaning to bring about …   Etymology dictionary

  • induce — [v] cause to happen; encourage abet, activate, actuate, argue into, breed, bring about, bring around, bulldoze*, cajole, cause, coax, convince, draw, draw in, effect, engender, generate, get*, get up, give rise to, goose*, impel, incite,… …   New thesaurus

  • induce — ► VERB 1) succeed in persuading or leading (someone) to do something. 2) bring about or give rise to. 3) produce (an electric charge or current or a magnetic state) by induction. 4) Medicine bring on (childbirth or abortion) artificially.… …   English terms dictionary

  • induce — 01. Civil servants are being [induced] to take early retirement in order to make cuts to the government s budget. 02. The family physician said he was afraid that surgery could [induce] a heart attack. 03. The baby was over 2 weeks late, and had… …   Grammatical examples in English

  • induce — [[t]ɪndju͟ːs, AM du͟ːs [/t]] induces, inducing, induced 1) VERB To induce a state or condition means to cause it. [V n] Doctors said surgery could induce a heart attack. [V ed] ...an economic crisis induced by high oil prices. 2) VERB If you… …   English dictionary


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